my name is siegfryd and i'm the running type. russian citizen so far. casually lethal. also, i have frequently not been on boats.
answers on a postcard?
~ Sunday, October 20 ~
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politics-war:

Tahrir Square, Cairo - Christians protecting Muslims at prayer during an Occupation.

politics-war:

Tahrir Square, Cairo - Christians protecting Muslims at prayer during an Occupation.


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~ Friday, June 21 ~
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mydaguerreotypeboyfriend:

Those are some choice last words, Captain Oates. And a great sweater to boot. 
From submitter laurielover1912

This is Captain Lawrence Oates, a member of Captain Scott’s doomed Antarctic expedition of 1910-1912. Oates was a cavalry officer who was in charge of the ponies on the expedition. I’ve had a huge historical crush on him for years and have him to blame for my username. Oates is best remembered for walking out into the blizzard to his death when he couldn’t continue due to the pain he was in, thereby giving his friends more chance of pulling through (sadly they didn’t). Just before leaving the tent, he famously spoke the words: ‘I’m just going outside and may be some time.’ The epitome of the competent but reserved English hero, he was also one very fine looking man.

mydaguerreotypeboyfriend:

Those are some choice last words, Captain Oates. And a great sweater to boot. 

From submitter laurielover1912

This is Captain Lawrence Oates, a member of Captain Scott’s doomed Antarctic expedition of 1910-1912. Oates was a cavalry officer who was in charge of the ponies on the expedition. I’ve had a huge historical crush on him for years and have him to blame for my username. Oates is best remembered for walking out into the blizzard to his death when he couldn’t continue due to the pain he was in, thereby giving his friends more chance of pulling through (sadly they didn’t). Just before leaving the tent, he famously spoke the words: ‘I’m just going outside and may be some time.’ The epitome of the competent but reserved English hero, he was also one very fine looking man.


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~ Thursday, June 20 ~
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redwoodcollective:

So around November a friend gave me a deer carcass for a project I’m in the process of cultivating. I left it hang in a tree over winter to dry out. Today, I went to take it down…but to my surprise, I found new life forming in the heart of death. 

redwoodcollective:

So around November a friend gave me a deer carcass for a project I’m in the process of cultivating. I left it hang in a tree over winter to dry out. Today, I went to take it down…but to my surprise, I found new life forming in the heart of death. 


190,713 notes
reblogged via skullandbone
~ Monday, June 3 ~
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theoceanspectre:

Eliot Hodgkin (1905-1987)Undergrowth 1941

Painted in London in 1941 during the artist’s ‘days off’ while serving as an air-raid warden, from drawings of plants and flowers made near Purley, Berkshire. He began painting in tempera in 1937 and this was the eighth tempera painting he did (letter of 31 October 1957).
The artist wrote in the R.W.S. catalogue, 1946: ‘Why tempera? …Because tempera enables me most nearly to achieve the effects I am aiming at. What I want to paint are the things that have been seen so often that people no longer notice them - or, if they are noticed, are no longer thought beautiful: such things as an old boot washed up by the tide, cabbages growing, a ruined room carpeted with snow, a tangle of weeds. I try to show these things exactly as they are, yet with some of their mystery and poetry, and as though seen for the first time. And it seems to me that, in trying to depict “a World in a grain of sand”, perhaps the best medium is tempera, because it combines clarity and definition with a certain feeling of remoteness.’

“… clarity and definition with a certain feeling of remoteness” — I like that; and what a beautiful, light-filled piece.
Image and description via the Tate

theoceanspectre:

Eliot Hodgkin (1905-1987)
Undergrowth 1941

Painted in London in 1941 during the artist’s ‘days off’ while serving as an air-raid warden, from drawings of plants and flowers made near Purley, Berkshire. He began painting in tempera in 1937 and this was the eighth tempera painting he did (letter of 31 October 1957).

The artist wrote in the R.W.S. catalogue, 1946: ‘Why tempera? …Because tempera enables me most nearly to achieve the effects I am aiming at. What I want to paint are the things that have been seen so often that people no longer notice them - or, if they are noticed, are no longer thought beautiful: such things as an old boot washed up by the tide, cabbages growing, a ruined room carpeted with snow, a tangle of weeds. I try to show these things exactly as they are, yet with some of their mystery and poetry, and as though seen for the first time. And it seems to me that, in trying to depict “a World in a grain of sand”, perhaps the best medium is tempera, because it combines clarity and definition with a certain feeling of remoteness.’

“… clarity and definition with a certain feeling of remoteness— I like that; and what a beautiful, light-filled piece.

Image and description via the Tate


13 notes
reblogged via incisorteeth
~ Friday, May 31 ~
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simply-war:



Protesters in Nairobi, Kenya, angry at departing legislators, doused 221 mock coffins with gasoline, one for each legislator, to protest the lawmakers’ effort to award themselves a $110,000 bonus. The bonus was vetoed by the president. Children played on the mock coffins before they were taken to Parliament and burned. January 16, 2013. Ben Curtis. 

simply-war:

Protesters in Nairobi, Kenya, angry at departing legislators, doused 221 mock coffins with gasoline, one for each legislator, to protest the lawmakers’ effort to award themselves a $110,000 bonus. The bonus was vetoed by the president. Children played on the mock coffins before they were taken to Parliament and burned. January 16, 2013. Ben Curtis. 


48 notes
reblogged via simply-war
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simply-war:

Blood for Oil: Kurdistan by Ivor Prickett

The semi-autonomous Kurdish region in Iraq’s north is booming. Thanks to oil and gas money, five star hotels, luxury shopping malls and gardened pavilions are popping up all over the region. Tourists, drawn by the area’s relative security and stunning natural vistas, are following: Erbil, the regional capital, was named the Arab Council on Tourism’s place to visit for 2014.

But a dispute over oil with Baghdad could threaten this newfound prosperity. Baghdad says the Kurds have no right to ink their own oil and gas deals with multinational companies and they have no right to export that gas. Some 60,000 troops – half Iraqi Army and half Kurdish peshmerga – are in a tense standoff in disputed lands along the Kurdish border near the town of Kirkuk. Though they are now close trading partners, Turkey still regularly bombs the PKK, a Turkish Kurdish group operating out of Iraqi Kurdistan. And some 65,000 Syrian Kurdish refugees, most of them housed in a UNHCR camp called Domiz near the city of Dohuk, are stretching Iraqi Kurdish resources thin. Since the fall of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War I, the Kurds have been seeking an independent state. They are closer than ever to that dream thanks to the oil and gas riches beneath their lands, but the fight over those same resources could bring war back to Iraq a year after the last U.S. troops left.


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sapphicslut:

as women, we are conditioned to smile and be polite

i’m trying to recondition myself to not do that

i’m sick of my automatic response to creepy fuckin dudes being a nervous smile and nausea

i want a chronic bitch face and when i get harassed i want my first response to be to spit and sneer

fuck your street harassment and fuck being polite

(Source: sapphicnymph)


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~ Wednesday, May 29 ~
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89yearsyoung:

The offering.

89yearsyoung:

The offering.


7 notes
reblogged via 89yearsyoung
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artparasite:


Keepsakes, Katy Horan

artparasite:

KeepsakesKaty Horan


115 notes
reblogged via artparasite
~ Saturday, May 25 ~
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reblogged via zeroing
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narcissusskisses:

The rain by Utagawa Hiroshige


39 notes
reblogged via superbestiario
~ Thursday, May 2 ~
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storiedthreads:

Rosencrantz: Do you want to play questions?Guildenstern: How do you play that?Rosencrantz: You have to ask a question.Guildenstern: Statement. One-Love.
Click here to go straight to the Etsy listing!

storiedthreads:

Rosencrantz: Do you want to play questions?
Guildenstern: How do you play that?
Rosencrantz: You have to ask a question.
Guildenstern: Statement. One-Love.

Click here to go straight to the Etsy listing!


96 notes
reblogged via storiedthreads
~ Monday, April 29 ~
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I don’t want your love unless you know I am repulsive, and love me even as you know it.
— Georges Bataille (via limbsdisjointed)

15,677 notes
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lauramakabresku:

Little Cradle.

lauramakabresku:

Little Cradle.


908 notes
reblogged via 27sailors